Religious Doctrine

The sacred texts, post-Darkness, can be found in a number of books: The Proverbs of Fergand; Enged’s Lives (stories of the saints by a contemporary); the Book of Gwyon (the “official” history of the War of the Three Realms); and two poems, The Death of Alaric and Maclyr’s Appeal, the latter a long, philosophical discussion between the hero and his lover, Queen Myra. There are also apocryphal works such as the Annals of Harmad and the Secret Book of Fergand, but their authenticity is strongly disputed.

Worshipers are encouraged to follow the Four Virtues of the Faith, worked out in Gwyon’s Second Council (year 44). These Virtues are Courage, Fidelity, Honesty and Charity. Naturally, a lot of effort has gone into elaborating these “virtues” and determining more specific codes of behavior from them. Nevertheless the “shield knot” (as it’s known in our world), tipped on its side to make a diamond, is a common symbol in the faith and it represents the Virtues.

Divisions have already emerged within religion, the most contentious dispute being between the Dominionists and the Perfectibilists. This dispute centers around a key event in the mythology. After Maclyr died fighting the dragon Asestet, the Archangel Venard came before the survivors that battle. He declared that “these mighty heroes” would live forever and they would have “eternal dominion” over the land and its people. Now did Venard grant the Dominion to the saints (the Dominionist view), or was he simply recognizing the immortality that the saints had won through their own efforts (the Perfectibilist view)? The Dominionists dominate the official Church, but Perfectibilists are found in the cults of individual saints.

Religious Doctrine

Dominion of the Dead kent_allard